The Rules of Riding

Riding techniques and safety discussions for both street and race.

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scooterwolf
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The Rules of Riding

Postby scooterwolf » Tue Aug 02, 2016 11:39 am

Anyone have any rules that will make you say "it's a no," in regards to riding that day? For me it's rain, snow, freezing temperature and heavy fog.
For others I've heard wind, and high temperatures as well. For those of us who love to ride, what does it take to stop you?

- Wolf

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Areomyst
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Re: The Rules of Riding

Postby Areomyst » Wed Aug 03, 2016 11:09 am

I don't mind riding in light rain, but heavy rain I don't care for mostly because of reduced visibility and the fact that I am less visible to other drivers. Freezing temperatures are something I ride in regularly in winter, but I have heated gloves and all that good stuff.

Really bad wind bothers me, but over the years I've found I can manage it better by getting more of my body weight on the floorboards of the scooter and relaxing my grip on the bars. A relaxed grip on the bars was a big game changer for me - I found I was able to corner harder, steer quicker, and really feel the input from the bike better!

If I am riding with my daughter, I will usually only go out when traffic is light, and weather is ideal. We also don't take the highway. She rather likes what few twisty roads we can find around here. :)

Despite the fact that it's less safe, I occasionally don't mind a challenge. I was riding on the highway to Raleigh one day and it started to rain, even though there wasn't any rain in the forecast to my recollection. There was construction on the highway and the road was muddy, and boy was that road slick! It was a bit unnerving to drive on that road, but despite the stress of it, by the time I got to my destination I was pleased with how I handled the situation.

In Pat Hahn's "Ultimate Street Strategies" I seem to remember him adamantly warning against driving at night at all - but I really don't mind. It's certainly less safe (again, due to visibility - and also nocturnal animals), but I enjoy the less congested roads, night time cool air, etc... I do of course reduce speed a lot while night riding.

I suppose, I'll say "It's a no" in heavy rain, freezing temps with precipitation, and sometimes I'll avoid riding if it's a holiday weekend and traffic is really stupid.

~Josh
"The more a man learns, the more he realizes how little he knows."

scooterwolf
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Location: South New Jersey

Re: The Rules of Riding

Postby scooterwolf » Thu Aug 04, 2016 9:47 am

In the Kymco forum one of our members was in a serious accident from riding at night on an unfamiliar road. He had to get his leg amputated below the knee due to the extent of his injuries.

I've driven at night, but I will only do so on familiar roads, but not if it's raining, snowing, or below freezing. Agree with you on the reduced visibility in heavy rain. All vehicles in my mirrors are seen only as a lens flare of light (those with their lights on). Too risky for me.

When I first began riding I gripped the bars too hard too, getting what I called riding elbow. Someone gave me the advice of a lighter grip and the problem went away. My hobby sport is fencing. We're taught not to gorilla grip the blade or you'll numb and fatigue your arm, making it easy for your opponent to kick you ass. Hard enough to hold a bird, but not kill it, is the given advice. Seems to apply to riding as well.

- Wolf

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Areomyst
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Re: The Rules of Riding

Postby Areomyst » Wed Aug 10, 2016 6:40 am

scooterwolf wrote:In the Kymco forum one of our members was in a serious accident from riding at night on an unfamiliar road. He had to get his leg amputated below the knee due to the extent of his injuries.

That is terrible! What happened? I always hate to hear about someone having an accident, much less a bad one...



scooterwolf wrote:When I first began riding I gripped the bars too hard too, getting what I called riding elbow. Someone gave me the advice of a lighter grip and the problem went away. My hobby sport is fencing. We're taught not to gorilla grip the blade or you'll numb and fatigue your arm, making it easy for your opponent to kick you ass. Hard enough to hold a bird, but not kill it, is the given advice. Seems to apply to riding as well.

Fencing seems neat! My nephew takes fencing lessons, but he's far away and I've only seen photos. I'd love to go watch him some day. I'm sure I'd be impressed. Being loose with your grip I think likely applies to very many things. Even driving my car, I can noticeably feel a lot more feedback through the steering wheel while still keeping enough grip to steer reliably. Being loose on the bars was certainly an interesting one for me. I'm more sensitive to what the suspension of the bike is doing, and highway riding, especially around big trucks (ugh...) is certainly a lot easier, and the bike tends to get blown around and shake a lot less...

Cheers!

~Josh
"The more a man learns, the more he realizes how little he knows."

scooterwolf
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Location: South New Jersey

Re: The Rules of Riding

Postby scooterwolf » Thu Aug 11, 2016 9:27 am

Areomyst wrote: That is terrible! What happened? I always hate to hear about someone having an accident, much less a bad one...


The rider was traveling at night down an unfamiliar road. Took a turn too fast and hit the dividing median. The sad part is many drivers passed him as he laid on the road and did not stop to render assistance.

Areomyst wrote: Fencing seems neat! My nephew takes fencing lessons, but he's far away and I've only seen photos. I'd love to go watch him some day. I'm sure I'd be impressed. Being loose with your grip I think likely applies to very many things. Even driving my car, I can noticeably feel a lot more feedback through the steering wheel while still keeping enough grip to steer reliably. Being loose on the bars was certainly an interesting one for me. I'm more sensitive to what the suspension of the bike is doing, and highway riding, especially around big trucks (ugh...) is certainly a lot easier, and the bike tends to get blown around and shake a lot less...


It’s an awesome sport. No different than boxing as you use all of your muscles, then throw in a sword. Little things, like the proper grip, can change a lot when riding. Even where and how you grab your brakes can add more control, especially in a panicked stop.


-Wolf


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